Types of Pain in the Heel

Types of Pain in the Heel

Have you ever thought about how many miles you have walked over your lifetime? In a year? A month? A week? A day? Every time you pound your feet on hard surfaces, especially when you aren’t wearing proper shoes, you may begin to develop pain in the heel. Sore heels will most likely cure themselves without resorting to surgery if given appropriate rest. However, people many times ignore the warning signs and don’t give their feet the rest they need. This can cause the pain and problem to worsen and could lead to a chronic condition. If your heel starts…
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Fungal Toenails…I’m Tired of These Embarrassing Toenails!

Fungal Toenails…I’m Tired of These Embarrassing Toenails!

Onychomycosis, or toenail fungus, is a problem that affects millions of people worldwide. Onychomycosis can be mild and only a cosmetic concern — but for many, the nail changes that occur develop dangerously thick, sharp, malodorous fungal toenails which can result in pain and can sometimes result in secondary bacterial infections. Most cases of toenail fungus are notoriously difficult to eliminate, mostly because the fungus resides throughout the nail, and even on the nail bed beneath it. The structure of the nail itself is not easily penetrated by topical agents, which makes topical treatments less effective than oral antifungal medicines.…
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5 Signs You Might Have Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot is one of the most common fungal infections. It occurs when the tinea fungus, which thrives in warm and moist environments, grows on the top layer of skin on the feet. The contagious nature of the infection means that it can easily spread to others. It can also spread to other parts of your own body, including your hands, underarms and groin. To prevent unnecessary discomfort, it is important to take action as soon as symptoms arise. Here are five signs of athlete's foot to look out for: Dry skin that looks cracked or flaky. Red, itchy skin, especially…
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Ouch! My Achilles Tendon Won’t Stop Hurting.

Ouch! My Achilles Tendon Won’t Stop Hurting.

Achilles tendon pathology can be separated into several catogies. Paratenosis, or inflamation to the soft tissue surrounding and bringing blood supply to the tendon, Tendonitis, or inflamation of the tendon itself, and finally Tendonosis, or a severe case of loss of blood supply to the paratenon and tendon; a stage with which cell death and rupture can occur. Most achilles tendon problems arise from a tightening or contraction of the tendon over time combined with over-pronation or fall of the arch of the foot. The achilles tendon twists on itself about 30 degrees in a medial direction from the knee…
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Even Professional Athletes Can Suffer From Plantar Fasciitis…A Game Ending Ailment

Even Professional Athletes Can Suffer From Plantar Fasciitis…A Game Ending Ailment

Professional athletes such as San Antonio Spurs player Tim Duncan have dealt with foot pain from a partially torn plantar fascia. Many can end up on the injured list putting a screeching halt to what would have been a successful season for the whole team. Plantar fascia tears are a common result of plantar fasciitis. Your plantar fascia extends from your toes to your heel bone. When the band of tissue has been constantly stretched it can end up having microtears throughout the body of tissue and these tears can cause a lot of pain and inflammation. A partially torn…
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Hate the Bunion?

Hate the Bunion?

Why do I have a bunion? Blame your genetics first, but your footwear next! Bunions tend to run in families, specifically among those who have the foot type prone to developing a bunion. If you have flat feet, low arches, arthritis, or inflammatory joint disease, you can develop a bunion. Footwear choices play a role too! Wearing shoes that are too tight or cause the toes to be squeezed together, like many stylish peep-or pointed-toe shoes, aggravates a bunion-prone foot. I hate my bunion...how do I get rid of it? There are several treatment options available from the most conservative to surgical correction to eliminate the…
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